Keynote – Job redesign interventions: insights from a practice-based theory of job design

During the EAWOP 2019 Congress Professor David Holman* will give a keynote presentation on job redesign interventions, as he explains to us:

My talk will focus on job redesign interventions (JDIs), which are important tools for organisational and employee development that seek to modify job characteristics as a means of enhancing employee outcomes. I will start by providing an overview of the strengths and limitations of our current understanding of JDIs. From this, I will then suggest that our understanding of JDIs can be advanced by using what I term a “practice-based theory of job design” that details the key practices (enacting, crafting and embedding) that organisational actors use to create, sustain and alter the content and characteristics of a job, and which highlights individual, organisational and institutional factors that shape the practice of job design. My talk will then show how a practice-based theory of job design can be used to provide a better understanding of, for example, the nature of JDIs (e.g., are they more enacting or crafting-focused) and the processes through which JDIs modify job characteristics, and how it can be used to point to the ways in which the design and implementation of JDIs could be developed to enhance the sustainability of their effects on employee practice and outcomes“.

*Brief Bio:

David Holman is Professor of Organisational Psychology and Head of the Organisational Psychology Group at Alliance Manchester Business School, University of Manchester. His research interests include job design, job redesign interventions, the organisational and institutional influences on job design and job quality, as well as emotion regulation in the workplace.  David’s work has been published across a range of journals (e.g., Academy of Management Annals, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Management Studies) and he has received best paper awards in Human Relations and the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology for his work on job quality and job redesign interventions.